Metacognition and Listening to our Listening

In a previous post I mentioned the word “Metacognition.” Here comes the word nerd in me, again. The word comes from the Greek prefix μετά meaning “after,” “beside,” “with,” or “among” and the Latin cognoscere which means “get to know.” It’s use has grown over the last half century in the fields of psychology and education. It means

“. . . put simply, thinking about one’s thinking. More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.” 1

Many have come to use a similar term in the study of listening, meta-listening. We could say, “Listening to our listening.” In the post about “Barriers to Good Listening,” I wrote about “Bonus Brain Time.” That’s the time created by the difference between the speed of speech and the speed of thought. It is within that time that the difference is made between not listening and super-power listening.

Try an exercise. This is the “planning” phase from the definition above. During your next conversation, practice being aware of how you are listening. This is the monitoring phase. Pay attention to your own posture and attention. Are you giving eye contact? Are you listening to what is being said or are you planning what you will say next? Then pay attention to the person talking. What words are they using? What are their body language and facial expressions saying to you?

After the conversation is over, make some notes. This is the assessment phase from the metacognition definition. How did you do? What did you learn about the person who was talking? Even more, what did you learn about your listening? Yourself as a listener? Practice that same process over and over. It will be very useful as you develop your listening skills.

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1 “Metacognition,” by Nancy Chick, Center for Learning online article at cft.vanderbilt.edu.

Equipping Extra

I recently posted about making sure people have the right tools and equipment to do their job. It’s important not only to have the right tools and equipment but also to be sure they are in top working order.

We recently had an experience at our house that tells this story well. We’ve had a particular high-end vacuum cleaner for 10 – 12 years. Over time it seemed to be losing suction. I went online and found a video about how to refurbish it for a fraction of the cost of a new unit. So I ordered the parts and did the work. Performance improved but it still didn’t seem like its old self.

My wife had been trolling the internet looking for deals on a new one. She found one but wasn’t convinced to make the purchase. Last weekend we were at one of the home improvement stores looking for something unrelated to vacuums. We came around a corner and (hear the sound of angels singing) there, in the middle of the aisle, far away from vacuums or appliances, stood a brand new vacuum like she’d been searching for, marked down 50% because the box had been opened.

We bought it. It was like Christmas morning when we got that thing home. We tore open the box (some assembly required) and got it going. What happened next was both exciting and disgusting. We vacuumed a rug in the living room. The vacuum literally pulled the rug up off the floor, the suction was so strong. In just a few short moments, the canister was getting full from what was coming out of that rug. My wife said, “I have spent 30 minutes before trying to get this rug vacuumed and look at this!”

We vacuumed our teenage son’s bedroom. When our daughter walked by it a few minutes later, after just coming home, she said, “Wow! Did you get new carpet?” The difference was that distinct. We vacuum regularly. But what came out of our carpets that day made it look like it had been months.

The moral of the story is that top performing tools and equipment are far more cost effective because they produce better quality outcomes with less effort. Repair or replace your tools and equipment and have fun being disgusted at what you find.

Word Nerd Alert – Enthusiasm

In my recent post on Inspiration, I mentioned the word “Enthusiasm.” This one gets my word nerd juices flowing, too. “Enthusiasm” can be traced all the way back to ancient Greek. It’s made up of the two words en-, meaning “in” and theos, meaning “God.” Put together, they form a Greek word enthous, meaning God within. As a verb, the word is enthousiazein, meaning “to be possessed by or filled with a god.” It was often associated with ecstatic or intense emotion.

It is that sense of excited emotion that lingers in the meaning today. Here are a few great quotes about enthusiasm:

  • “Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm.” –Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • “Enthusiasm is the electric current that keeps the engine of life going at top speed” –W. Clement Stone
  • “Knowledge is Power, Enthusiasm pulls the switch” –Ivern Ball
  • “If you’re not fired with enthusiasm, you’ll be fired with enthusiasm!” –Vince Lombardi.

There is an energy around enthusiasm. What happens when you are around enthusiastic people? It affects you. At least it raises your energy level if not making you enthusiastic as well.

I love it! As Susan Rabin says, “Enthusiasm is contagious. Be a carrier!”

Its Not Just Pizza Parties

I was in a meeting awhile ago with several Director level representatives of a healthcare organization. We were in the final design phase of a training program for supervisors in that organization.

This particular meeting was to discuss interview questions to use when hiring supervisors. The idea was that selecting a good fit is the first step in a successful development program. We had identified several categories of questions that aligned with the competencies we wanted the supervisors to develop. Of course, Employee Engagement was one of those categories. We were designing open ended, experience based questions that begin with, “Could you tell me about a time when you . . .”

I suggested a couple of questions and explained that those questions were testing for how the candidate had engaged previous employees. I further explained that the focus was on how the candidate engaged at the level of three primary intrinsic motivators: Autonomy, Mastery, and Transcendent Purpose. The specific Engager Dynamics the questions probed were, Solicit, Cultivate, and Inspire. Part way through my explanation, one of the directors said, “That doesn’t have anything to do with Employee Engagement.” He went on to describe his view of Employee Engagement which was having pizza parties and attendance award programs.

Don’t get me wrong, I love pizza parties and recognition programs. However, this interaction demonstrates a common misunderstanding of Employee Engagement. Leaders often think making employees happy with periodic trinkets equals employee engagement. I’m also in favor of making employees happy as often as possible. But, Employee Engagement is more than that. It’s about how you encourage people to invest their discretionary time, mental and physical energy, and creativity into improving the business. Follow some of the links I’ve included in this post to find out more.

Expect – Engager Dynamic #1

“Expectation is the root of all heartache,” someone has said. I would agree with one clarification. It is unmet expectation that causes all heartache. It’s true in marriage, family, work, community, politics, etc. To go a step further, one of the most toxic killers in any relationship is unspoken expectations. Not meeting an expectation is one thing. Not knowing what the expectation is and then learning you didn’t meet it can be devastating.

Word Nerd Alert

According to the Merriam-Webster online dictionary an Expectation is

    “A feeling or belief about how successful or good someone or something will (should) be.”

 An Exercise in Unmet Expectations

I’ve taught this material in a classroom setting, I like to ask the group to take out a piece of paper and a pen or pencil. I then ask them to put their name at the top of the paper and explain that I want to go through an important exercise with them. Then I tell them that the exercise is foundational to understanding the Engager Dynamics and have them number down the left side of the paper from 1 – 10. I explain that they have three minutes to complete the exercise. Then I tell them to begin.

What’s wrong with this exercise? There are no instructions, no expectations have been set. People don’t have any idea what I want them to do. They believe it’s important. They figure that I want 10 of something and they know the timeline. But, what in the world do I expect them to write? They haven’t a clue! You should see the reactions I get to this stress, and it’s artificially induced. Imagine the stress of a similar situation in real life . . . or maybe you don’t have to imagine.

A Real Life Example

I recently stopped at the drive-through of a well-known fast food restaurant for a cup of coffee. I waited for several minutes and the line didn’t move. Still wanting that cup of coffee, I decided to go inside. The scene inside was tense. Many people were waiting for food or to place their order. People in the back were working but things weren’t flowing and there was frustration in the air. A young woman whom I assume was the shift manager turned from the drive through window and said to the crew in the back, “C’mon you guys!” That was it, “C’mon you guys!” Nothing changed. I did eventually get my cup of coffee but it took way too long.

When the shift manager issued her exasperated rebuke, the looks on her colleague’s faces said, “What do you expect us to do?” There it is. What was the expectation? That was a real-life example of my staged exercise where unclear or missing expectations create stress.

What Do You Do?

The job of the Leader is to set clear expectations and make sure all employees know what the expectations are. Some examples include:

  • What Skills do you expect employees to have or gain?
  • What Duties do you expect the employees to perform?
  • What are the quality and timeline expectations?
  • What attitudes do you expect the employees to have toward each other, toward customers, the company, the boss?
  • What else do you expect? (e.g. do all your employees give you a “high five” when they see you? If so, will you expect that of new employees? If s/he doesn’t give you a “high five” will you be offended and think poorly of the new hires? It may sound silly, but that’s a real life example and these are the kinds of subtle things that can fall into the category of unspoken expectations. Be sure you’re self-aware)
How do you communicate your expectations?

  • Job descriptions
  • Duty Lists
  • During Training
  • Employee handbooks
  • Policies and Procedures manuals
  • Posters
  • Verbally
It is not enough to simply tell an employee about an expectation once and leave it at that. People need to hear a thing 3 – 7 times, preferably through different media, before it will really sink in. Communicate, communicate, and communicate. It is also very important to be consistent in your communication. Send the same message to each employee.

Setting clear Expectations that are communicated effectively and consistently will pay dividends on employee engagement not only for its own sake but also when it comes to Performance Evaluations and Trust. Both of these are critical Engager Dynamics we will discuss later. Expectations impact them both.

A Word About Barriers

Expectations can remain unmet for several reasons. For example, someone attempting to meet an expectation could be blocked by a co-worker, by broken or missing equipment or even by a policy that conflicts with the expected outcome. The result of blocked attempts to meet an expectation is frustration. Or, as in the examples above, expectations could be unclear causing anxiety among the workers. Failure to meet expectations causes discouragement which lowers morale. On the other hand, when expectations are clearly understood and met or exceeded, engagement occurs and morale improves.

Flip the Coin

 
Most conversations about expectations at work revolve around making sure employees know and meet (or exceed) the expectations of the company and their boss. Remember, employees have expectations, too. They have expectations about their co-workers, their relationship with the boss, the value of their work, etc. One of the best ways to engage employees around expectations is to exceed their’s.

 

A Word that Blew My Mind

פָּנִים

I called myself a “Word Nerd” in my last post.  It’s true, I am.  So I decided to share a word that blew my mind. I know that in the process I will be giving further evidence of my nerdiness but that’s OK.
A few years ago I was in a financial planning class and the instructor  made reference to an ancient Hebrew proverb. He was talking about taking care of your business in general terms. I was intrigued so I looked up the proverb and did what I usually do (word nerd). I broke it down and looked at the meanings of the words. The proverb in English says, “Be sure to know the condition of your flocks, give careful attention to your herds; for riches do not endure forever . . .” Proverbs 27:23 – 27 It goes on to say that if you take care of your flocks and herds, they will take care of you when times get tough.
The word that blew my mind was “condition,” not too amazing at first. But, the proverb was originally written in ancient Hebrew. I still have some tools from my ministry days, so I looked it up. The Hebrew word is Paniym (it’s the word pictured in the title of this post). It means “faces!” The proverb says, “Be sure to know the faces of your flocks . . .” When I discovered that meaning, the faces of all my colleagues at work started racing through my mind. I could see them happy, I could see them stressed, I could see them frustrated and angry. These people with whom I worked every day, most of them were my employees, were my flock. They were the ones who did the work that determined the success or failure of the business. The proverb goes on to say, as I further learned, “Put your heart into taking care of your herds!” Wow! My job is to take care of the people who do the work so they can take care of the work.
One of the main things I learned from this was that the principles of Employee Engagement are not new. This proverb was written around 3,000 years ago yet it sounds strangely like “The Service-Profit Chain,” (Harvard Business Review) and the findings of many other modern studies. Put your heart into taking care of the people that take care of your business. It makes sense. It has for a long, long time.